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Ruth Bader Ginsburg will lie in repose at the Supreme Court

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  • Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will lie in repose at the Supreme Court on Wednesday and Thursday, giving mourners an opportunity to pay their last respects to the longtime legal giant.
  • Ginsburg will lie under the Portico at the top of the Supreme Court building’s front steps.
  • Members of the public can attend the outdoor viewing, which will occur from 11 a.m. until 10 p.m on Wednesday and from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Thursday.
  • Next week, Ginsburg will be interred at Arlington National Cemetery in a private ceremony.
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Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will lie in repose at the Supreme Court in Washington, DC, on Wednesday and Thursday, giving mourners an opportunity to pay their last respects to the longtime legal giant.

Ginsburg’s casket will arrive in front of the Supreme Court building before 9:30 a.m. on Wednesday, with a private ceremony set to commence in the Great Hall, according to a release issued by the Court. The ceremony will include family members, friends, and members of the Supreme Court.

Ginsburg will then lie in repose on the Lincoln Catafalque under the Portico at the top of the building’s front steps for an outdoor viewing. Members of the public are invited to the viewing, which will occur from 11 a.m. until 10 p.m on Wednesday and between 9 a.m. and 10 p.m. on Thursday. 

Next week, she will be interred at Arlington National Cemetery in a private service, alongside her late husband, Martin Ginsburg, who died in 2010.

In following a longtime Supreme Court tradition, a black wool crepe has been placed on Ginsburg’s bench chair and the bench immediately in front of it. This tradition dates to the death of then-Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase in 1873. A black drape has also been placed over the doors to the main courtroom.

Ginsburg, who died on Friday on the eve of Rosh Hashanah at the age of 87, served for 13 years on the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit before being appointed to the Supreme Court in 1993 by then-President Bill Clinton. During her 27 years on the Supreme Court, she led the court’s liberal bloc and became a feminist icon.

President Donald Trump is pushing to name a successor to Ginsburg later this week, most likely on Friday or Saturday.

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