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Rep. Steve King says there would be no population without rape, incest

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Republican congressman Rep. Steve King of Iowa — a controversial figure even in his own party — questioned whether “there would be any population” without pregnancies from rape and incest at a Wednesday event in Iowa.

King, who is ardently anti-abortion, was arguing in favor of banning abortions without any exemptions for pregnancies that resulted from rape or incest in an address to the Westside Conservative Club.

“What if we went back through all the family trees and just pulled out anyone who was a product of rape or incest? Would there be any population of the world left if we did that?” he said, according to the Des Moines Register.

“Considering all the wars and all the rapes and pillages that happened throughout all these different nations, I know that I can’t say that I was not a part of a product of that,” he added.

King, who has been in office since 2003, has a long history of making highly controversial and inflammatory comments on a wide range of topics including immigration and abortion.

Read more: A GOP congressman punished for making racist remarks slams his fellow Republicans for subjecting him to a ‘political lynch mob’

“It’s not the baby’s fault for the sin of the father, or of the mother,” he said of pregnancies that result from sexual assault or incest.

In January, King lost his committee assignments after questioning how terms like “white supremacist” became offensive in an interview with The New York Times.

“White nationalist, white supremacist, Western civilization — how did that language become offensive?” King wondered to The Times.“Why did I sit in classes teaching me about the merits of our history and our civilization?”

After the interview sparked widespread outrage, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy expelled King from serving on any committees in the 116th Congress, and the House near-unanimously passed a resolution denouncing white supremacy in all forms.

While King has been continually re-elected since his first run in 2002 despite a substantial track record of tacitly supporting avowed white supremacists and making racist comments, the loss of his committee assignments was the strongest rebuke he’d ever received from Republican leadership.

Two other Republican members of the House, Rep. Chris Collins of New York and Rep. Duncan Hunter of California, also lost their committee assignments after they were indicted on federal charges of insider trading and campaign finance fraud, respectively.

King is facing a primary challenge from Iowa state Senator Randy Feenstra. Democrat JD Scholten, who challenged King in 2018, is also running again.

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