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Paul Manafort new accusations, plea agreement in jeopardy

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Paul Manafort
Paul
Manafort.

Thomson
Reuters


  • Paul Manafort, the former campaign chairman of Donald
    Trump, violated his plea agreement by lying to the FBI and
    special counsel Robert Mueller’s office “on a variety of
    subject matters,” according to court filing.
  • Mueller’s office asserted that “the nature of the
    defendant’s crimes and lies, including those after signing the
    plea agreement,” freed them of any obligation from the plea
    agreement.
  • Manafort’s attorney’s disputed the special counsel’s
    characterization.
  • It was not immediately clear what Manafort had lied
    about. Mueller’s office said that it was provide further
    information in a later court filing.

Paul Manafort, the former campaign chairman of Donald Trump,
violated his plea agreement by lying to the FBI and special
counsel Robert Mueller’s office “on a variety of subject
matters,” according to
court filing
on Monday.

The plea agreement, which Manafort signed two months ago,
stipulated that he would be in violation if he were to “engage in
any criminal activity prior to sentencing,” or failed to “fulfill
completely ‘each and every one’ of his obligations.”

Mueller’s office asserted that “the nature of the defendant’s
crimes and lies, including those after signing the plea
agreement,” freed them of any obligation from the plea agreement.

“A breach relieves the government of any obligations it has under
the agreement … but leaves intact all the obligations of the
defendant as well as his guilty plea,” the court filing said.

Manafort’s attorney’s disputed the special counsel’s
characterization and claimed that their client “provided
information to the government in an effort to live up to his
cooperation obligations,” the filing added.

It was not immediately clear what Manafort had lied about.
Mueller’s office said that it was provide further information in
a later filing, according to CNN.

In September, Manafort pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy
to obstruct justice and one count of conspiracy against the US.

But things between the special counsel and Manafort have
reportedly been rocky for a while. Earlier this month, ABC News
reported that talks between the two sides had broken down.

Since pleading guilty, Manafort had met with prosecutors
nearly a dozen times, and though members of Mueller’s team have
been asking him about a wide range of topics, they’re “not
getting what they want,” a source with knowledge of the
discussions told ABC News.

Andrew Weissmann, a prosecutor working for Mueller, told US
District Judge Amy Berman Jackson when Manafort’s plea deal was
announced that Manafort would cooperate “in any and all matters
as to which the government deems the cooperation relevant,”
including “testifying fully, completely” before a grand jury.

Manafort’s plea agreement also says that if he “has failed to
cooperate fully” or “intentionally given false, misleading or
incomplete information or testimony,” he “will not be released
from his pleas of guilty but the Government will be released from
its obligations.”

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