Connect with us

Politics

Paper apologises for cartoon showing Blasey Ford demand roses and M&Ms

Published

on



WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 05: Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee during the second day of his Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill September 5, 2018 in Washington, DC. Kavanaugh was nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the vacancy on the court left by retiring Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Supreme Court nominee
Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee
during his confirmation hearing on September
5.


Chip
Somodevilla/Getty Images




  • The Indianapolis Star has apologized for a cartoon
    that shows Kavanaugh accuser Blasey Ford demand trivial things
    like roses and M&Ms when testifying about her
    accusations.
  • Ford, through her lawyers, has called for conditions
    that will make for a fair hearing, and previously called for an
    FBI investigation.
  • The Star’s executive editor apologized, saying the
    newspaper should not “demean or appear to belittle anyone who
    says they are the victim of a sexual assault.”
  • The artist also made a statement, saying: “As a husband
    and father of a daughter and granddaughters, I take sexual
    harassment very seriously.”

A newspaper has apologized for publishing a cartoon that showed
Christine Blasey Ford, who is accusing Supreme Court nominee
Brett Kavanaugh of sexual assault, of making unreasonable demands
like roses and M&Ms as she publicly testifies.

Ford, who is due to testify in front of the
Senate Judiciary Committee
on Thursday
, has
said through her lawyers
that she wants conditions that would
make it a fair hearing and has previously requested an FBI
investigation. The Indianapolis Star published a
cartoon of Ford in front of the committee, where she makes
different demands.

“Here are my demands,” she is depicted telling the panel. “No
questions from lawyers, dim the lights, I want roses, sparkling
water, a bowl of green M&Ms.”

Ronnie Ramos, the executive editor of the Indianapolis
Star,
said in a note on the newspaper’s website
on Monday that the
paper “has a responsibility to promote a civil discourse and to
present diverse viewpoints in a way that does not demean or
appear to belittle anyone who says they are the victim of a
sexual assault.”

Our readers deserved better in this case,” he
wrote. “The cartoon did not meet our high standards.”

Many people online had expressed opposition to the way it
depicted Ford.

The artist, Gary Varvel, also made a statement about the cartoon,
published in Sunday’s edition.

“My cartoon was focused only on Ford’s demands, not on whether
she was telling the truth,” he said. “This is a point I should
have made clearer in my cartoon. As a husband and father of a
daughter and granddaughters, I take sexual harassment very
seriously.”

Ford accuses Kavanaugh of pinning her to a bed,
groping her, and putting his hands over her mouth when she
resisted at a high school party in the
1980s. 
Kavanaugh
has repeatedly denied the accusation.

Michael R. Bromwich, a lawyer for
Ford, 

said that the plan for Thursday’s public
hearing
risks turning it into a trial
and “does not appear designed
to provide Dr. Blasey Ford with fair and respectful
treatment.”

Ford is requesting that she is questioned by senators, but
Republicans are considering bringing in an outside counsel.
Bromwich said this could risk turning the hearing into
a  “circus.”

Continue Reading
Advertisement Find your dream job

Trending