Connect with us

Politics

Kavanaugh and his wife defend against sexual misconduct allegations

Published

on


President Donald Trump with Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh
President
Donald Trump with Supreme Court nominee Brett
Kavanaugh

Evan
Vucci/AP


  • Judge Brett Kavanaugh and his wife, Ashley Kavanaugh, will
    appear in an unusual — if not unprecedented — interview, in which
    they’ll address allegations of sexual misconduct.
  • In an attempt to reassure Republican senators and the party’s
    voters that Kavanaugh remains the best choice for the Supreme
    Court, the White House and the GOP are taking the extraordinary
    step of green-lighting an offensive attack starring the nominee
    himself. 
  • Media reporters and others see the interview as White
    House-orchestrated propaganda effort to boost Kavanaugh days
    before one of his accusers testifies before the Senate. 

Judge Brett Kavanaugh and his wife, Ashley Kavanaugh, will appear
in an unusual — if not unprecedented — interview, in which
they’ll address the allegations of sexual misconduct the Supreme
Court nominee is facing, with Fox News on Monday night. 

In an attempt to reassure Republican senators and the party’s
voters that Kavanaugh remains the best choice for the nation’s
high court, the White House and the GOP are taking the
extraordinary step of greenlighting an offensive attack starring
the nominee himself. 

Kavanaugh has forcefully denied allegations that he sexually
assaulting a girl in high school and exposed himself to a female
classmate in college, calling two women’s claims “smears, pure
and simple” and “grotesque and obvious character assassination”

in a letter
to the Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday.

And he vowed not to withdraw his nomination, a promise he also
makes in the interview with Fox host Martha MacCallum,
several excerpts of which were released by Fox on Monday
evening. 

In the interview, which will air at 7 p.m. on Monday, Kavanaugh
repeats his denials of the allegations ahead of the Thursday
hearing in which both he and one of his accusers, Christine
Blasey Ford, are scheduled to testify before the Senate
committee. 

“The truth is I’ve never sexually assaulted anyone, in high
school or otherwise,” he said on Fox. “I am not questioning and
have not questioned that perhaps Dr. Ford at some point in her
life was sexually assaulted by someone at some place, but what I
know is I’ve never sexually assaulted anyone.”

Kavanaugh cited his “lifelong record of promoting dignity and
equality for women starting with the women who knew me when I was
14 years old” and insisted that he never had sex throughout
college and for “many years after.”

Journalists and others quickly pointed out that it is highly
unusual for a Supreme Court nominee to conduct an interview with
the media or engage in an effort to clear his own name during the
confirmation process — and even more unusual for the interview to
be conducted by a partisan news network. 

“If you’re not familiar with what Supreme Court nominees normally
do, this is not what they normally do,” HuffPost senior reporter
Jeffrey Young‏ tweeted.
“If you’re familiar what what statist propaganda organizations
normally do, however, this is what they normally do.”

Some questioned the appropriateness of a Supreme Court nominee
appearing on a right-leaning network. 

“If you wanted at least the appearance of objectivity, ie
‘balls and strikes,’ why not a more neutral network? Or customary
morning show interview?” wrote
HuffPost politics reporter Igor Bobic.

Others argued that the interview was orchestrated to appeal to
conservatives — given that Fox is the go-to network for the
president and his followers — and is not an attempt to repair
Kavanaugh’s reputation among the broader population, with whom he
is
deeply unpopular

“There’s a huge difference between Sotomayor on Sesame Street or
Scalia on 60 Minutes and this, of course. Choosing Fox News makes
it look like an effort to reassure conservatives in particular,”
New Republic reporter Matt Ford tweeted
Monday, referring to media appearances made by Justice Sonia
Sotomayor
and late
Justice 
Antonin Scalia,
both of which were conducted while two were sitting on the
Supreme Court. 

Washington Post media columnist Margaret Sullivan argued
that interview is nothing more than White House propaganda,
facilitated by Bill Shine, the former Fox executive who
now serves
as a top communications staffer in the White House.

“Female interviewer, check. Fox News, check. Bill Shine
approved, check. When an ‘exclusive interview’ promises to be a
challenge-free infomercial,” Sullivan tweeted

MacCallum, a veteran Fox host, notably defender Fox’s late chief
executive, Roger Ailes, against claims from multiple women that
he sexually harassed them. Ailes was ultimately pushed out of the
network over the allegations. 

“Roger is such a terrific boss. I don’t like to see anything that
reflects negatively on him,” MacCallum said
in 2016

Shine, who for years served as Ailes’ right hand, was also forced
to resign from Fox last year over his handling of sexual
misconduct allegations made by several female employees against
senior male anchors at the network.

Continue Reading
Advertisement Find your dream job

Trending