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Just 52% of Americans are ‘very comfortable’ with a woman president

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Democratic Sens. Kirsten Gillibrand and Kamala Harris, both potential 2020 contenders.
Democratic
Sens. Kirsten Gillibrand and Kamala Harris, both potential 2020
contenders.

Michael Kovac/Getty
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  • Just over half of Americans are “very comfortable”with the
    prospect of a female commander-in-chief, according to a new
    report released this week by the consulting firm Kantar
    Public. 
  • On this question, the US came in third among G7 nations —
    behind the UK and Canada.
  • This comes as women, particularly in the Democratic party,
    are being elected to office in the US in historic numbers. 

Just over half of Americans are “very comfortable” with the
prospect of a female commander in chief, according to
a new report
released this week by the consulting firm Kantar
Public. 

According to the report, 52% would feel “very comfortable” with a
woman at the head of government, and 63% would feel similarly
comfortable with a woman as a CEO of a major company.

The study surveyed 10,000 people across seven developed nations —
the members of the G7 — to investigate public sentiment
concerning women in leadership, and they were given a score from
0 to 100 on the Reykjavik Index for Leadership. “A score of
100 means that across society, there is complete agreement that
men and women are equally suited to leadership in all sectors,”
the report explains. Out of the G7 nations, the US ranked third
with a score of 70.

Both the UK and Canada reported a higher tolerance for women in
political leadership — 58% of those surveyed in the UK and 57% of
those polled in Canada said they’d be “very comfortable” with a
woman head of government. At the low end of the spectrum, just
26% of those in Germany and 23% of those in Japan felt the same
way. 

In the US, women — particularly in the Democratic party — are
running for office, and winning, in unprecedented numbers. And
several female politicians, including Sens. Elizabeth Warren,
Kamala Harris, Amy Klobuchar, and Kirsten Gillibrand, are

likely contenders
for the 2020 Democratic presidential
nomination. 

Some of these women have pointed to their gender as an attribute,
rather than a barrier, in their pursuit of power. 

“It’s time for women to go to Washington and fix our broken
government and that includes a woman at the top,” Warren told
supporters in September. “So here’s what I promise: after
November 6, I will take a hard look at running for
president.” 

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