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Juror from Paul Manafort’s trial reveals how one holdout affected the case

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paula duncan
Paula Duncan, one of the jurors from Paul Manafort’s
trial.

Fox News

  • A juror who participated in the trial of President
    Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, said
    just one holdout prevented the jury from convicting Manafort on
    all of the 18 federal charges he faced.
  • In a Fox News interview on Wednesday, Paula Duncan, a
    self-described Trump supporter, said the unidentified juror was
    not convinced that Manafort was guilty of all 18 criminal
    charges he faced.
  • The jury found Manafort guilty on eight counts,
    including bank fraud, tax fraud, and failure to disclose a
    foreign account. The judge in the case declared a mistrial on
    the remaining 10 charges.
  • “We all tried to convince her to look at the paper
    trail, we laid it out in front of her again and again,” Duncan
    said of the holdout juror.
  • Duncan also described the room in which the jurors,
    some of them emotional, deliberated Manafort’s case: “Crazily
    enough, there were even tears.”

A juror who participated in the trial of President Donald Trump’s
former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, said just one holdout
prevented the jury from convicting Manafort on all of the 18
federal charges he faced.

In a Fox News interview on Wednesday, Paula Duncan, a
self-described Trump supporter, said the unidentified juror was
not convinced that Manafort was guilty of all 18 criminal charges
he faced.

“We all tried to convince her to look at the paper trail, we laid
it out in front of her again and again,” Duncan said during an
interview with Fox News host Shannon Bream.

Manafort was ultimately convicted on eight counts on five counts
of tax fraud, two counts of bank fraud, and one count of failure
to report a foreign bank account. The judge declared a mistrial
on the remaining 10 counts.

Duncan claimed that the holdout juror is the one who prompted
them to send a note to Judge T.S.
Ellis asking for an explanation of the term, “reasonable doubt.”

“Most of us did not want that question out there … we felt a
little foolish,” Duncan said.


Paul Manafort
Paul
Manafort, President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman,
departs the Federal District Court in Washington, November 2,
2017.

AP Photo/Andrew
Harnik


The interview Wednesday night marked the first time a juror has
publicly identified themselves after the trial. Judge Ellis
cautioned against publicizing the juror’s identities, citing the
high-profile nature of the case. Ellis previously said he had
personally received “criticism and threats” while presiding over
the trial.

“I don’t feel a threat,” Duncan said. “I’m an American, I’m a
citizen, I feel I did my civic duty. I don’t think I need to hide
behind anything. I’m not afraid at all.”

Duncan said she wanted to come forward because “the public,
America, needed to know how close this was.”

“The evidence was overwhelming,” Duncan said. “I did not want
Paul Manafort to be guilty, but he was, and no one is above the
law. So it was our obligation to look through all of the
evidence.”

“The charges were legitimate but the prosecution tried to make
the case about the Russian collusion right from the beginning,
and of course the judge shut them down on that,” Duncan added.
“We did waste a bit of time with that shenanigans.”

Asked if she believed there were jurors whose personal political
views influenced their decisions, Duncan said she did not believe
so.

“I think we all went in there, like we were supposed to and
assumed Mr. Manafort was innocent. We did due diligence, we
applied the evidence, our notes, the witnesses, and we came up
with the guilty verdicts on the eight counts.”

Duncan also described the room in which the jurors, some of them
emotional, deliberated Manafort’s case: “Crazily enough, there
were even tears,” Duncan said.

Manafort was found guilty of tax fraud, bank fraud, and failure
to report foreign bank accounts. He was indicted as part of
special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia probe.

Manafort will face a new judge and jury in another trial in
September on charges that include obstructing justice and failing
to register as a foreign agent.

After Manafort’s arrest, Trump distanced himself from his former
surrogate and said “it doesn’t involve me.”

In several tweets on Wednesday morning,
Trump referred to Manafort as “a brave man,” and contrasted his
behavior with that of Michael Cohen, his longtime personal
attorney, who implicated Trump as a participant in his crimes in
a plea deal he signed a day earlier.

Trump has since discussed the pros and cons of pardoning
Manafort, according to his attorney, Rudy Giuliani. Giuliani
echoed Trump’s assertion that he believes Manafort was treated
“horribly” by the justice system.

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