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Global central bank September meeting schedule, rate expectations

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On Thursday, the European Central Bank announced a round of stimulus for the eurozone that included both a rate cut and quantitative easing.

Interest rates were slashed 10 basis points to -0.5%, the lowest level ever and the bank said it will begin purchasing 20 billion euros of bonds a month starting in November to inject money back into the economy.

It’s the first time the ECB has changed the deposit rate since 2016, a bold cut for outgoing president Mario Draghi, who will be replaced by Christine Lagarde— the former International Monetary Fund Chairman — on November 1. The move is the latest in a trend of central banks lowering rates to boost local economies.

In addition, smaller banks have also handed down rate cuts. Turkey’s central bank also surprised with a jumbo rate cut early Thursday before saying that it will begin to slow its pace of monetary easing going forward. Later in the day, Denmark also cut its interest rate to a historical low, following in the ECB’s footsteps, Bloomberg reported.

Read more: ‘Being boiled like frogs’: A Wall Street investment chief unloads on how the Fed’s behavior is actually hurting the middle class it’s supposed to be helping

However, not every central bank has handed down a rate cut this month. Earlier in September, Australia’s central bank held interest rates at a low 1%, and Canada’s held its rates at 1.75%.

But going forward, there are likely more cuts from major central banks on the horizon. After the ECB decision, all eyes are on the Federal Reserve, which meets September 18. Most investors think that the Fed will cut rates, but it remains to be seen by how much. President Trump has stepped up his bashing of the Fed and Chairman Jerome Powell, saying they should cut faster.

Trump has even gone as far to say that the US should have zero or negative interest rates, following in the footsteps of countries in Europe and Japan that have had very low and even negative rates for years.

Here are the seven central banks that have yet to meet in September, as well as what markets and investors expect them to do at upcoming meetings:

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