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Conservative MPs want Theresa May to work with Jeremy Corbyn

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Theresa May must work with Jeremy Corbyn if the Prime Minister is to get Parliament’s support for her Brexit deal.

That is according to senior Conservative MPs, who have said “cross-party” discussions will be needed to ensure Britain does not end up with a delayed Brexit, or leave the European Union with no deal. A compromise, which could include a second referendum, may be needed to receive the backing of opposition parties like Labour, the SNP, and Plaid Cymru.

Earlier this week, May lost the support of more than a third of her MPs as she attempts to lead a minority government through the most difficult parliamentary process any prime minister has faced for decades. This means it is harder than ever before to get her Brexit deal approved by Parliament.

She has since returned to the European Union to make legal changes to her Brexit deal, but this was rejected by leaders in Brussels.

The former education secretary Nicky Morgan and the former minister for skills Nick Boles now say it is essential that the PM seeks talks with Corbyn and other party leaders to garner support.

“After this week’s events in Westminster and Brussels, the only way the prime minister gets any kind of deal through is with cross-party support and proper discussions to secure that now need to start,” Morgan told The Independent.

Boles said: “Next week she must open cross-party discussions, and if Corbyn won’t play ball, talk to SNP, Plaid Cymru and backbench Labour MPs.”

He added: “What sort of compromise could secure the additional 120 votes she needs? Norway-plus? Second referendum? Permanent customs union? Or some combination?”

Labour, of course, may not be keen to work with May. According to The Telegraph sources, the Shadow Brexit secretary Keir Starmer and the deputy Labour leader Tom Watson want Corbyn to “table a no-confidence in the Government before Christmas.”

Those closest to Corbyn, though, reportedly believe that timescale risks uniting a fractured Conservative party. Instead, Labour could wait for May to bring her Brexit deal back to Parliament until it calls a no-confidence vote.

Either way, discussions with May do not seem to be on the Labour agenda.

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