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Russian novichok board game sparks anger in Salisbury | World News

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A board game which retraces two Russian assassins’ route to Salisbury where they carried out a novichok attack has angered the city’s residents.

Named “Our People in Salisbury”, the children’s game sees players race from Moscow to the cathedral city where former Russian spy Sergei Skripal, 67, and his daughter, Yulia, 33, were poisoned in March last year.

Nearly four months later, Charlie Rowley, 45, and Dawn Sturgess, 44, were poisoned by novichok in nearby Amesbury, with Ms Sturgess dying, after they picked up a discarded bottle of the nerve agent.

The game includes stops in Geneva, Paris, Amsterdam and London, all cities the two alleged Russian hitmen visited on their way to poison Mr Skripal in Salisbury.

Novichok board game. Pic: Ruptly
Image:
The player who evades police and is the fastest to travel through Europe to Wiltshire wins. Pic: Ruptly

The player who evades police and is the fastest to travel through Europe to Wiltshire wins.

Salisbury’s former mayor, Jo Broom, said the game was “a kick in the teeth”.

It is being sold for just under £1 online and was developed by two businessmen.

One of the two men, Mikhail Bober, told Russian state media the game was created in response to Western condemnation over the Salisbury attack, which led to countries all over the world pulling diplomats out of Russia in support of the UK.

“We decided to make our humorous answer for our Western neighbours by creating a board game, where our compatriots walk freely in Europe and explore the sights,” he said.

Ruslan Boshirov (left) and Alexander Petrov have been named as suspects
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British police have charged Russian GRU agents Anatoliy Chepiga and Alexander Mishkin

British police have charged Russian GRU agents Ruslan Boshirov and Alexander Petrov – real names Anatoliy Chepiga and Alexander Mishkin – with administering the nerve agent that poisoned the four people in Wiltshire.

Ms Broom, who is still a Salisbury City councillor, said: “I think it’s extremely sad, shows a shocking disregard really for all those that have been involved in the tragedy last year.

“I think it’s bad taste… to do something like this, especially when we’re trying to move on and inject some positivity back into the city and this sort of smacks of a bit of a kick in the teeth really.”

In December, Russian state broadcaster RT sent models of Salisbury Cathedral made out of chocolate to contacts as a Christmas present.

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