Connect with us

Featured

Glasgow artist Charlotte Prodger wins for films made on smartphone

Published

on

Charlotte Prodger has won the 2018 Turner Prize for two films she made entirely on an iPhone.

Judges said that the Glasgow-based artist approached the iPhone “as a prosthesis or extension of the nervous system… body and device become extensions of each other.”

The jury admired the painterly quality of one of her films, BRIDGIT, and the attention it pays to art history.

They also praised the way Ms Prodger, 44, explores lived experience as mediated through technologies and histories.

Artist Charlotte Prodger presents BRIDGIT at Tate Britain
Image:
Artist Charlotte Prodger presents BRIDGIT at Tate Britain

The £25,000 art prize, named after English painter JMW Turner, is presented annually to a British visual artist.

The other shortlisted artists for 2018 were Forensic Architecture, Naeem Mohaiemen and Luke Willis Thompson.

This year’s shortlist was more overtly political, with the artists all tackling “pressing political and humanitarian issues of today,” and featuring neither sculptures or paintings.

Alex Farquharson, director of Tate Britain, said: “It’s the first year that all four artists have used moving images.

Tate Britain employees pose in front of Luke Willis Thompson's entry
Image:
Tate Britain employees pose in front of Luke Willis Thompson’s entry

“They have done so in a variety of different ways, in terms of what they used and what they are using it for. It’s a political Turner Prize, but deals with many other things.”

Shortlisted artist, Luke Willis Thompson, made a black and white, silent 35mm portrait of Diamond Reynolds.

Reynolds broadcast live, on Facebook in 2016, the immediate aftermath of the fatal shooting of her boyfriend, Philando Castile, by a police officer during a traffic stop in the US.

Academic group Forensic Architecture, known for its “spatial investigations of state and corporate violations worldwide,” also use mobile phone footage in much of its work.

Forensic Architecture present its investigations into human rights violations
Image:
Forensic Architecture present its investigations into human rights violations

Naeem Mohaiemen, whose work encompasses films, installations and essays, also made the shortlist.

His works investigate a “sense of melancholia for lost political dreams,” memories of Leftist political utopias and “legacies of decolonisation.”

Last year, Lubaina Himid became the oldest artist to win the Turner Prize, at the age of 63, after it was opened up to older artists.

More follows…

Advertisement Find your dream job

Trending