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Emiliano Sala: FIFA urged to act after Cardiff miss deadline for first payment on £15m fee | World News

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Nantes have made a claim to FIFA against Cardiff City over the £15m transfer fee agreed for Emiliano Sala.

The Argentinian forward became Cardiff’s record signing on 19 January but he died when the private plane carrying him to Cardiff crashed into the English Channel two days later.

Nantes wrote to Cardiff earlier this month asking that the first of three instalments of the £15m fee be paid but the Premier League club said they wanted to wait until investigation of the crash was complete.

View looking at windscreen and cockpit area
Image:
Pictures of the crashed aircraft on the sea bed have been released by investigators

Cardiff have, however, made it clear they will be “honourable” over the fee if they are contractually obliged to pay.

Last week, the two clubs agreed to extend the deadline on the first instalment of the fee until 27 February.

That deadline has now been reached and Nantes have asked FIFA to get involved.

A FIFA spokesperson told Sky Sports on Wednesday: “We can confirm that we have received yesterday evening a claim from FC Nantes against Cardiff City in connection with the transfer of Emiliano Sala.

“We are looking into the matter and consequently we have no further comments at this stage.”

Cardiff manager Neil Warnock has backed the Bluebirds’ handling of the sensitive issue, saying last week that “the club will deal with it in the right way.”

Aircraft track in the vicinity of Guernsey
Image:
The AAIB published a picture showing the plane’s erratic flight path

On Wednesday, a spokesman for the ongoing search for pilot David Ibbotson said they had found nothing.

Marine scientist David Mearns tweeted: “Sadly there was absolutely no sign”.

Mr Mearns later added that a helicopter search of inaccessible parts of the French and Channel coastline “was also negative”.

On Monday, investigators from the Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) released an interim report, which raised questions about the validity of Mr Ibbotson’s pilot licence.

He was only permitted to fly passengers in the European Union if they were contributing to the cost of the flight, rather than for financial gain.

Pilots with his licence “must have a bona fide purpose for making the flight”, according to the AAIB.

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